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March 08, 2007

Happy International Women's Day


Liberator, originally uploaded by taisau.

The poster is from the Golden Age of cycling in the 1880s when bicycles became both a symbol and a means of women's liberation. Click on the photo to read the interesting essay about cycling and women's liberation.

Some other items of interest:

-The theme of International Women's Day 2007 is Ending Impunity for Violence against Women and Girls. Nine UN agencies are launching a major initiative this to prevent rape in post-conflict situations. "The Stop Rape Now" campaign is putting on events in Nairobi, Geneva and New York.

-The International Labor Organization (ILO) has released a new report on the Feminization of Working Poverty to coincide with International Women's Day. (Via LabourStart).

-Hillary Clinton has reintroduced pay check equity legislation.

-Norbizness runs down the Male Privilege checklist.

-In honor of IWD, food blogger yumsugar reflects on the progress of female chefs in top kitchens. Did you know that Cris Comerford became the first woman head Chef at the White House in 2005? Yumsugar shares Comerford's recipe for State of the Union soup.

-Finally, here's a nice round-up of IWD-related history at Legal History Blog.

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Comments

Worst. Bike messenger. Ever.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jillnic83/411499742/

This is bullshit. You post a photo of a totally different person on the top of your blog, and then I see a real photo of you with this Arizona State sorority chick. And it turns out Darcy really is a guy. WTF?

I only read this blog in the first place because I thought you were a hot lesbian. I'm out of here.

Are you sure that's not an ad for an ill-conceived production of the Ring Cycle?

I had to sit once through an entire semester of a Victorian era history class about the damn bicycles social liberating effect on women. I know more than any one cares to know about the bicycle/feminism nexus.

I need information of bicycles & feminism like a fish need cat!

And International Women's Day originated in America, just as May Day qua international workers' day did! Cold War "Americanism" robbed us of much of our social-democratic heritage.

Aside from everything else, it's always fascinated me that the Victorians are simultaneously synonymous with repressed sexuality and a predilection to show breasts wherever and whenever possible.

(Which says a lot about pornography, I suppose, although I'm not quite sure what.)

Incidentally, great find, although it's sad how something like acknowledging that women can exercise was a great step forward.

I prefer Labor day..

A trivia question for International Women's Day:

What are the five states that have never elected a woman to the Senate or the House of Representatives?

Hint: Their two-letter postal abbreviations can be anagrammed into "VAST MINDED".

The link says the poster is from 1899:

"one ad from around 1899 for Liberator Cycles depicted a bare-breasted helmeted Amazonian warrior alongside her wheels"

http://www.flickr.com/photos/taisau/36089690/

I managed to find a goofy angle on the stats of violence in relationships. In abuse of significant others, men massively outpace women, but in violence within "romantic triangles", women are somewhat less lopsidedly represented among the assailants. Somebody has to think of these things?

Sons and Lovers has a wonderful description of the liberating effect of the bicycle. Before it, a village girl's fate was to choose from the young men within three or four miles of her house, who came courting under the watchful eyes of her parents. With it, groups of young people from twenty miles around could go off together for long afternoons of riding, walking, talking, and flirting. It made an enormous difference in the life of the countryside.

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