Please visit the new home of Majikthise at bigthink.com/blogs/focal-point.

« Houston evac post mortems | Main | Frist insider trading timeline »

September 27, 2005

Operation Deep6: How Democrats can reclaim the Senate

Bob Brigham points to a heartening analysis of the 2006 Senate races by Charlie Cook's (National Journal, subscription only):

In the Senate, though, Democrats need a net gain of six seats to win the majority, so logically they need to put six GOP seats in play.

They have accomplished that; in fact, seven Republican-held seats are now in play. They are the seats held by Republican Sens. Jon Kyl of Arizona, Jim Talent of Missouri, Conrad Burns of Montana, Mike DeWine of Ohio, Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island and Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee.

Democrats have credible candidates in all but one of those states, Ohio.

It appears likely that their nominee will be Paul Hackett, the lawyer and Iraq War veteran who came close to picking off a special election in Ohio's 2nd congressional district against now-Rep. Jean Schmidt.

If GOP Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi retires, as many expect he will, that would set up yet another competitive Republican-held Senate seat, bringing the total to eight.

Historically, mid-term elections kick parties when they're down. If the Republicans go into the 2006 races on the defensive--and it's hard to see how they won't, given the Katrina debacle and the carnage in Iraq--then the Democrats have a real opportunity to shift the balance of power in the Senate.

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c61e653ef00d83490b5fb69e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Operation Deep6: How Democrats can reclaim the Senate:

Comments

That would be more comforting if we could have any confidence that the votes in the election would actually mean something.

Until the method of voting is secure for all citizens, no election can be considered valid.

That would be more comforting if we could have any confidence that the votes in the election would actually mean something.

Until the method of voting is secure for all citizens, no election can be considered valid.

I get to vote in one of those!

Even if the Democrats don't gain enough seats for a majority, the country could definitely benefit from a Senate without Santorum or Frist.

Dare I say it... OK, I'll say it. I'll scream it. THE HOUSE IS INFINITELY MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE SENATE. The senate has that fillibuster thing: a minority can screw up, or at least, vastly slow down, the majority there. The senate is more glamorous, votes on judges and treaties and s***... but the House (1) initiates all-- ALL spending bills; (2) impeaches Presidents (3) IMPEACHES PRESIDENTS (no President has ever been removed, and this one won't be either, but the impeachment itself is crippling) (4) has a "simple majority can shut out the minority" rule, and (5) as a body, has an effective veto over everything (as does the senate, but see "filibsuter").

Right now, we are a mere 16 seats away from a majority there, in a 435 seat body... with all 435 up... as opposed to 6, 7 or 8 out of only 34 or so contested... plus, we don't have to worry about massively expensive statewide campaigns in giant states like Ohio, Pennsylvania and Missouri. Last round, there were allegedly 40 seats in play, and the Dems didn't even run candidates in around half of them; we have GOT to take the position that all 232 GOP House members are vulnerable... every last one... and make 'em fight for it.

The Senate would be nice; the House and Senate would be nicer, but the House has really been the bulwark and home-base of the GOP's contract on America... its time we terminated that contract.

I wasn't convinced by your impeachment argument the first time, but when you repeated it in caps...

Talking Dog: It doesnt matter how much more important the House is ... it's outta reach this time round, courtesy of a hundred+ years of gerrymandering.

The comments to this entry are closed.