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September 28, 2006

Final passage: Bush/McCain Torture Bill


, originally uploaded by gardengal.

The Bush/McCain Torture Bill passes the Senate, 65-34.

Watch your back.

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"And DC statehood can lead into a discussion of Guam statehood (really) and US Virgin Islands statehood and Puerto Rico statehood and Marianas Islands statehood and and endless stream that follows. Every spec of land does not get to be a state. And the compact that led to the creation of the District of Columbia said that it would not be a state. If you want to undo the compact, that just return the land to the place where it came from. That would be the fair thing, selon moi."

Only problem with that logic is that many of those territories do not want to become US States and have benefits because of it, such as they don't have to pay federal taxes. Whereas, I do. So therefore, if they do not want to afford me the right to have equal representation, they can do without my tax dollars. If they wish to vote on that, I would be fine with it since, if I have no say in government, why should I be paying for it? Also, due to our size we are larger than any of the other US territories excluding Puerto Rico, so why shouldn't we be considered for statehood?

And yes, Mildred, I started that because people were talking about mailing/calling their congressmen, and I said that I have noone to mail or call because of where I live.

I would be happy with Phantoms solution of becoming part of Maryland, though since Maryland is already largly Democratic, it might be nice to help Northern VA. out and come part of their state. However, I'd prefer it just stay D.C. and elect my own representatives.

So a "spec" like Rhode Island is a state because it was one of the original thirteen colonies, and Puerto Rico is not because, well, it's just a colony. Makes sense.

DC has more people in it (582,049) than my state: Wyoming (493,782). Why shouldn't it get statehood, thus giving it its own congressional delegation? Oh, that's right; they'd be dirty fucking Democrats. This country doesn't need any more traitors in Congress, does it? My big rectangle is more important than some little ol' fucked up diamond shape. Because we're Republicans, damn it!

Phantom: Which Republican Member of Congress do you work for, or are you freelance?

whig

The Republicans should be so lucky. I speak to straight to be work for any of them, with the possible exception of Peter King.

And DC statehood can lead into a discussion of Guam statehood (really) and US Virgin Islands statehood and Puerto Rico statehood and Marianas Islands statehood and and endless stream that follows. Every spec of land does not get to be a state. And the compact that led to the creation of the District of Columbia said that it would not be a state. If you want to undo the compact, that just return the land to the place where it came from. That would be the fair thing, selon moi.

Why should territories under permanent US control not have voting rights?

The compact is entirely irrelevant. The number of original compacts in the US that included slavery is probably too large to list them all. Britain functions perfectly well without stripping Londoners of the right to vote.

Speaking of Britain, maybe the US should just retroactively abolish DC and move the capital to another city. I propose Anchorage, to show how far away politicians are from most citizens.

Alon

I can understand the desire for voting rights, but you simply can't have a microscopic entities like Guam or USVI become a state with two Sentators just like NY or California or Texas. That's just stupid.

I'm not crazy about the bicameral legislature system we have now, which has it's own wild disparities ( California having the same number of senators as Nevada ) but this would make it worse.

It was suggested at one time to have Guam be attached to Hawaii for such purposes, ie be able to vote in Hawaiian US Senatorial elections.

And the compact is not irrelevant in any way. DC was created to have a special status as a national capital. If people are unhappy with that, then lets undo the compact and return to the prior status. No mess, no foul. Why would anyone have a problem with that?

BTW, as a place that has recently elected and reelected a crackhead as mayor, DC is the last place in the world that needs to be a state.

First choice- leave DC as is
Second choice- return it to Maryland
Third choice- re-do the entire legislative system. Get rid of the Senate, and go the unicameral route. More efficient, far more democratic. But can never happen because the small states would never let it happen.

The small states also would have to vote on any state of DC. Which they won't, either.


BTW, as a place that has recently elected and reelected a crackhead as mayor, DC is the last place in the world that needs to be a state.

Yeah, can’t trust those porch-monkeys to be responsible; always stealin’ chickens and watermelons an’ all.

As for moving the capitol to Anchorage, I think it’s an excellent idea. Natural resource issues might actually get a decent hearing. Perhaps we could have a peripatetic capitol: move it every 15 years say.

Periodically there’s talk here in the Northwest of splitting Washington and Oregon along the Cascade crest which would produce liberal-leaning I-5 corridor coastal western states and guaranteed rock-hard 110% conservative interior eastern states. Statehood is something the Framers meant to be flexible, we should trust them on this.

Statehood is something the Framers meant to be flexible, we should trust them on this.

Something I agree with in concept, but the devil is in the details. Any change will have affect all other states.

The "DC Statehood" movement, which has about as much chance of succeeding as an effort to move the Dodgers back to Bedford Avenue, has nothing to do with self-government or rights. The subtext is an attempt to gerrymander two additional Democrat Senatorial seats in perpetuity.

I have a lot of problems with the existing system, but it won't change. The Electoral College stays. The assholic two legislature system stays. The current state borders won't be changed. See no prospect of any new states coming into the Union anytime soon, by gerrymander carvouts or expansion, unless the Canadian Maritimes or some of the Western provinces decide to join the fold.

Oh, Canada. You'll be welcome here anyday, with the possible exception of occasional-troublemaker Quebec. And unlike DC, Canada would pay its own way!


Actually, I've heard that they would consider giving DC Statehood if Puerto Rico agreed to become a State, therefore balancing out a Republican state with a Democratic state. However, neither will either happen in my opinion.

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